February 2016 | Babineau Cosmetic & Family Dentistry

February 2016

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February 2016 – Children’s Dental Heath Month February 01, 2016

In this issue
What Are Dental Sealants?
What Are Dental Sealants?

Dental sealants act as a barrier to prevent cavities. They are a plastic material usually applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth (premolars and molars) where decay occurs most often.
Thorough brushing and flossing help remove food particles and plaque from smooth surfaces of teeth. But toothbrush bristles cannot reach all the way into the depressions and grooves to extract food and plaque. Sealants protect these vulnerable areas by “sealing out” plaque and food.
Sealants are easy for your dentist to apply. The sealant is painted onto the tooth enamel, where it bonds directly to the tooth and hardens. This plastic resin bonds into the depressions and grooves (pits and fissures) of the chewing surfaces of back teeth. The sealant acts as a barrier, protecting enamel from plaque and acids. As long as the sealant remains intact, the tooth surface will be protected from decay. Sealants hold up well under the force of normal chewing and may last several years before a reapplication is needed. During your regular dental visits, your dentist will check the condition of the sealants and reapply them when necessary.
The likelihood of developing pit and fissure decay begins early in life, so children and teenagers are obvious candidates. But adults can benefit from sealants as well.

Key ingredients in preventing tooth decay and maintaining a healthy mouth are:

  • brushing twice a day with an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste
  • cleaning between the teeth daily with floss or another interdental cleaner
  • eating a balanced diet and limiting snacks
  • visiting your dentist regularly

Ask your dentist about whether sealants can put extra power behind your prevention program.

**For the month of February, when you schedule 3 sealants for yourself or any family member, you will receive the 4th one free. That’s a savings of 25%!!

Preventing Tooth Decay for Your Child
Preventing Tooth Decay for Your ChildChildren are born with a set of primary teeth – 20 to be exact – that help them learn to chew, learn to speak, and develop enough space in the jaw for the permanent teeth that will appear several years later. Kids’ teeth are especially susceptible to decay, which can cause pain and tooth loss, problems that could interfere with oral development. As a parent, it is important that you take proactive steps to keep your child’s primary teeth as healthy as possible…

Childrens Dental Health Awareness
Childrens Dental Health Awareness

Children are born with a set of primary teeth – 20 to be exact – that help them learn to chew, learn to speak, and develop enough space in the jaw for the permanent teeth that will appear several years later. Kids’ teeth are especially susceptible to decay, which can cause pain and tooth loss, problems that could interfere with oral development. As a parent, it is important that you take proactive steps to keep your child’s primary teeth as healthy as possible.

The Dangers of Bottles and “Sippie Cups”
Also known as early childhood caries, baby bottle tooth decay refers to tooth decay in infants and toddlers. Your child needs strong, healthy primary teeth to chew food properly and learn to speak, so preventing baby bottle tooth decay is very important. Early childhood caries can occur in children as young as a year old, when they are allowed to go to bed with bottles and sippie cups of milk or juice. The sugars in these beverages, even natural sugars, can steadily decay the teeth. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests, and we agree, that milk and juice should only be offered to your child at meal times. Limit juice intake to just a few ounces per day. If your child becomes thirsty between meals or likes to go to bed with a bottle, we suggest you serve water during those times. Proper Hygiene As a parent, you can establish healthy dental habits long before your child’s first tooth erupts. Start by gently wiping your baby’s gums with a clean wash cloth during the first months of life. By age one, graduate to an appropriately sized toothbrush and use a smear of fluoridated toothpaste, about the size of a grain of rice, to brush at least twice a day. When your child is about three years old, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Watch your child as he or she brushes to make sure none of the toothpaste gets swallowed.

Dental Visits Dental visits should start young and continue on a regular basis throughout your child’s life. In our office we recommend they come into our office for a check-up and cleaning usually between ages of 2-3.  Prior to this, the pediatrician is looking in the mouth and visually looking for any abnormalities and decay. The American Dental Association recommends that parents bring their children to the dentist for the first time no later than the child’s second birthday. Initial visits at our office concentrate on an examination of the proper development of your child’s primary dentition and parental education, while future visits may include thorough cleanings and fluoride treatments as your child grows.

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Phone: 512-306-8900
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