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February 2016

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February 2016 – Children’s Dental Heath Month February 01, 2016

In this issue
What Are Dental Sealants?
What Are Dental Sealants?

Dental sealants act as a barrier to prevent cavities. They are a plastic material usually applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth (premolars and molars) where decay occurs most often.
Thorough brushing and flossing help remove food particles and plaque from smooth surfaces of teeth. But toothbrush bristles cannot reach all the way into the depressions and grooves to extract food and plaque. Sealants protect these vulnerable areas by “sealing out” plaque and food.
Sealants are easy for your dentist to apply. The sealant is painted onto the tooth enamel, where it bonds directly to the tooth and hardens. This plastic resin bonds into the depressions and grooves (pits and fissures) of the chewing surfaces of back teeth. The sealant acts as a barrier, protecting enamel from plaque and acids. As long as the sealant remains intact, the tooth surface will be protected from decay. Sealants hold up well under the force of normal chewing and may last several years before a reapplication is needed. During your regular dental visits, your dentist will check the condition of the sealants and reapply them when necessary.
The likelihood of developing pit and fissure decay begins early in life, so children and teenagers are obvious candidates. But adults can benefit from sealants as well.

Key ingredients in preventing tooth decay and maintaining a healthy mouth are:

  • brushing twice a day with an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste
  • cleaning between the teeth daily with floss or another interdental cleaner
  • eating a balanced diet and limiting snacks
  • visiting your dentist regularly

Ask your dentist about whether sealants can put extra power behind your prevention program.

**For the month of February, when you schedule 3 sealants for yourself or any family member, you will receive the 4th one free. That’s a savings of 25%!!

Preventing Tooth Decay for Your Child
Preventing Tooth Decay for Your ChildChildren are born with a set of primary teeth – 20 to be exact – that help them learn to chew, learn to speak, and develop enough space in the jaw for the permanent teeth that will appear several years later. Kids’ teeth are especially susceptible to decay, which can cause pain and tooth loss, problems that could interfere with oral development. As a parent, it is important that you take proactive steps to keep your child’s primary teeth as healthy as possible…

Childrens Dental Health Awareness
Childrens Dental Health Awareness

Children are born with a set of primary teeth – 20 to be exact – that help them learn to chew, learn to speak, and develop enough space in the jaw for the permanent teeth that will appear several years later. Kids’ teeth are especially susceptible to decay, which can cause pain and tooth loss, problems that could interfere with oral development. As a parent, it is important that you take proactive steps to keep your child’s primary teeth as healthy as possible.

The Dangers of Bottles and “Sippie Cups”
Also known as early childhood caries, baby bottle tooth decay refers to tooth decay in infants and toddlers. Your child needs strong, healthy primary teeth to chew food properly and learn to speak, so preventing baby bottle tooth decay is very important. Early childhood caries can occur in children as young as a year old, when they are allowed to go to bed with bottles and sippie cups of milk or juice. The sugars in these beverages, even natural sugars, can steadily decay the teeth. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests, and we agree, that milk and juice should only be offered to your child at meal times. Limit juice intake to just a few ounces per day. If your child becomes thirsty between meals or likes to go to bed with a bottle, we suggest you serve water during those times. Proper Hygiene As a parent, you can establish healthy dental habits long before your child’s first tooth erupts. Start by gently wiping your baby’s gums with a clean wash cloth during the first months of life. By age one, graduate to an appropriately sized toothbrush and use a smear of fluoridated toothpaste, about the size of a grain of rice, to brush at least twice a day. When your child is about three years old, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Watch your child as he or she brushes to make sure none of the toothpaste gets swallowed.

Dental Visits Dental visits should start young and continue on a regular basis throughout your child’s life. In our office we recommend they come into our office for a check-up and cleaning usually between ages of 2-3.  Prior to this, the pediatrician is looking in the mouth and visually looking for any abnormalities and decay. The American Dental Association recommends that parents bring their children to the dentist for the first time no later than the child’s second birthday. Initial visits at our office concentrate on an examination of the proper development of your child’s primary dentition and parental education, while future visits may include thorough cleanings and fluoride treatments as your child grows.

Quick Links
Visit our web site >>

Email: scheduling@babineausmiles.com
Phone: 512-306-8900
Web: http://babineausmiles.com
3801 Capital of Texas Hwy. N.;Suite E-280, Austin, TX, 78746

June 2015 Newsletter

June Newsletter July 15, 2015
In this issue

Teeth have stem cells!

Do you know that you can easily store your family’s own unique stem cells to treat future diseases or injuries?
We want to be proactive and educate our patients about the discovery of stem cells in teeth. A tooth is nature’s treasure chest of a person’s unique stem cells. There is an abundance of these cells in baby teeth, wisdom teeth, and permanent
teeth. Learn how to preserve them for the future.It’s in your children’s best interest to let us preserve their baby teeth, bicuspids (sometimes extracted for braces), and wisdom teeth. In the past these teeth with their miraculous cells would have been discarded as medical waste or be saved in a jewelry box as tooth fairy collectibles. Not anymore!Your Family’s Healthy Future is Here Today!It’s time to secure and store your family’s unique stem cells. This way you’ll have the ability to provide regenerative medical providers with your stem cells if they are ever needed to treat a disease or injury. The restorative properties of stem cells are unique
because they drive the natural healing process throughout life.Our practice has established a strategic alliance with Vault Stem Cell, Inc. We take care of properly preparing your tooth (or teeth) for overnight medical shipping to Vault. You open an account and pay your storage fees directly to Vault. Be sure to take advantage of the $200 Gift Certificate Vault has graciously
extended to our patients through June 30.Call us today at (512) 961-5786 to discuss how easy it is to collect, evaluate and store your family’s stem cells.Celebrating your continued health!
Drs. John and Lori

$200 Gift Certifcate

gift-certificate

Call us today at (512) 961-5786 to discuss how easy it is to collect, evaluate and store your family’s stem cells.Our Babineau team will explain how to set up your Vault account and take advantage of their generous $200 off Gift Certificate good through June 30.

It is 1-2-3-4 easy. Here is how it works.

1. Collection

When a tooth is removed as part of a baby tooth, wisdom or orthodontia procedure, it is placed in a FDA qualified tissue collection kit. We then ship the kit medical overnight to Vault Stem Cell, Inc.2. Evaluation
Once Vault receives the kit, they will evaluate the stem cells to determine viability.3. Storage
Your stem cells will be stored using approved Tissue Banking Standards with a backup system.4. Peace of Mind
Keep your Vault ID card in your wallet. This way you can notify medical professionals immediately that your child’s stem cells are banked with Vault should they be needed for an emergency.It’s important to note: the stem cells from teeth have been observed in research studies to be among the most powerful stem cells in the human body.  Stem cells from teeth replicate at a faster rate and for a longer period of time than do stem cells harvested from other tissues of the body.

What are stem cells?
Unlike other cells in the body, stem cells have the ability to transform into different types of cells and can be used to regenerate tissue, bone, cartilage, and neural tissue.There are more than 2000 ongoing studies using mesenchymal stem cells from teeth for treatments in regenerative medicine.Many diseases require having stem cells that were collected prior to your
child getting sick.Additionally regenerative medicine requires a genetic tissue match to be effective, that means your stem cells will not work for your child, only theirs is a genetic match.What is your child’s risk?
Look to your family history.Do any of these diseases run in your family? If so, future stem cell treatments could
help.ALS
Alzheimer’s
Arthritis
Cancer/Tumor
Cardiovascular Disease
Crohn’s
Disease
Diabetes ‘
Joint Pain
Kidney Disease
Leukemia
Liver Disease
Lupus
Lymphoma
Macular Degeneration
Multiple Sclerosis
Parkinson’s Disease
Spinal Cord Injury
StrokeVault Stem Cell provides patients with a system to securely, reliably and efficiently collect and store their individual stem cells and tissue for the future use in age reversal and disease treatments.JUNE SPECIAL
Bask in a Babineau
Summertime Special
$200 OFF
Dental
Treatment

Offer valid for dental treatment of a $1000 or more. Applied to deductible or out-of-pocket expenses. Mention our Babineau June 2015 newsletter. Offer expires June 30, 2015

Quick Links
Email: scheduling@babineausmiles.comPhone: 512-306-8900Web: http://babineausmiles.com
3801 Capital of Texas Hwy. N.;Suite E-280, Austin, TX, 78746

May 2015 Newsletter

May Newsletter July 15, 2015
In this issue

Acidic Foods And Your Tooth Enamel

Acid attack!

Many people consume carbonated beverages, fruit juice and highly acidic foods every day but probably don’t realize that they may be harming their teeth. The acid in the foods we eat and drink can cause tooth enamel to wear away and teeth can become sensitive and discolored. In many cases, it’s not what you eat and drink that is as important as how you consume these
foods.

What is tooth erosion?

Tooth erosion, or tooth wear, is the loss of tooth structure caused by the weakening of dental enamel. Dental enamel is the thin, outer layer of hard tissue that helps maintain the tooth’s structure and shape. When the enamel   weakens, it exposes the underlying dentin (the tissue that makes up the core of each tooth), causing the teeth to appear
yellow.

What causes tooth erosion?

Tooth erosion may occur when the enamel on your teeth is weakened by the acid found in many foods and drinks. Usually the calcium contained in saliva will help remineralize (or strengthen) your teeth after you consume small amounts of acid; however, the presence of a lot of acid in your mouth does not allow for remineralization. Acid can come from many sources, including the
following:

  • Carbonated drinks. All soft drinks (even diet varieties) contain a lot of acid and can dissolve enamel on your teeth very   quickly.
  • Fruit juice and wine. Juice and wine have similar effects on your teeth because they contain acid.
  • Fruit, pickles, yogurt and honey. These foods are acidic; don’t let them linger in your mouth. Swallow them as soon as   you’ve chewed them enough.
  • Bulimia and acid reflux. Bulimia and acid reflux also can cause tooth damage from stomach acids coming into contact with teeth. Medical and dental help should be sought for anyone who suffers from   either of these conditions.

What are some signs of tooth erosion?

Acid wear may lead to serious dental problems. It is important to notice the signs of tooth erosion in its early stages (sensitivity, discoloration and rounded teeth) before more severe damage occurs (cracks, severe sensitivity and other problems).

  • Sensitivity. Since protective enamel is wearing away, you may feel a twinge of pain when you consume hot, cold or sweet food and drink. As more enamel is worn away, teeth become increasingly sensitive.
  • Discoloration. Teeth can become slightly yellow because the thinning enamel layer exposes the underlying dentin.
  • Rounded teeth. Your teeth may have a rounded or ‘sand-blasted’ look.
  • Transparency. Your front teeth may appear slightly translucent near the biting edges.
  • Advanced discoloration. Teeth may become more yellow as more dentin is exposed because of the loss of protective tooth enamel.
  • Cracks. Small cracks and roughness may appear at the edges of teeth.
  • Cupping. Small dents may appear on the chewing surface of the teeth. Fillings also might appear to be rising up out of the tooth.

What can I do to prevent tooth erosion?

Because there are different reasons why you may experience tooth erosion (swishing carbonated drinks, drinking a lot of juice or wine, eating disorders), talk to your dentist about your habits so that a plan for preventive action can be determined. Be smart about how you consume acidic foods and you can continue enjoying the things you like. Here are some general ways to protect your
teeth:

  • Reduce or eliminate drinking carbonated drinks. Instead, drink water, milk or tea — but skip the sugar and honey!
  • If you must consume acidic drinks, drink them quickly and use a straw so that the liquid is pushed to the back of the mouth. Don’t swish them around or hold them in your mouth for long periods.
  • Don’t let acidic foods linger in your mouth; swallow them as soon as you’ve chewed them enough so that they are ready to digest.
  • Instead of snacking on acidic foods throughout the day, eat these foods just during meal times in order to minimize the amount of time the acid is on the teeth.
  • After consuming high-acid food or drinks, rinse with water to neutralize the acids.
  • Chew sugar-free gum to produce more saliva, as this helps your teeth remineralize.
  • Brush with a soft toothbrush and be sure your toothpaste contains fluoride.
  • Your dentist may also recommend daily use of a toothpaste to reduce sensitivity (over-the-counter or prescription strength) or other products to counter the effects of erosion.

Frequently Asked Questions about Invisalign®
Are you wondering what Invisalign treatment is really like, and what effect it will have on your day-to-day activities? Will it slur your speech? Will people even know you’re in treatment? You’re not alone in your concerns! Here are some of the most common questions we hear about Invisalign.

Arthritis and Gingivitis
small-perio-diagram

Richard H. Nagelberg, DDS
The concept of a relationship between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was discussed more than 50 years ago. There is much about the origin of rheumatoid arthritis that is still unknown. The anatomic site at which RA-related autoimmunity is initiated and the timing are also elusive currently. Systemic inflammation and the autoimmune processes begin long
before the onset of perceptible joint inflammation.
Research suggests that RA-related autoimmunity may be initiated at a mucosal site years before the onset of joint symptoms. Potential sites of initiation include gastrointestinal, lung, and oral mucosa. Additional studies of individuals in the preclinical period of RA that can provide insight into the relationship between mucosal inflammation, RA-related autoantibody
generation, and subsequent joint inflammation in RA are needed. An improved understanding of the initial steps in the development of RA would provide insights into disease pathogenesis leading to more effective treatments and/or novel preventive strategies in RA (Demoruelle et al. 2014).
Since the publication of the first study in 2009 (Smolik et al.), which revealed the association between Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and rheumatoid arthritis, a number of additional studies have been conducted that reach the same conclusion as the original one. The Smolik study indicated that further studies were needed to affirm their findings, and that affirmation is
well under way.
The body produces a number of enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). These enzymes convert the amino acid arginine within a peptide (i.e., protein building blocks) into peptidylcitrulline in a process known as citrullination. Protein citrullination plays a vital role in normal physiology, in which it is involved in the formation of rigid structures such as
skin, hair, and myelin sheaths, as well as other normal physiological effects in the body. So the enzyme PAD and the process of protein citrullination are important components of normal physiology. P. gingivalis is the only microbe known also to produce the enzyme PAD. Aberrant citrullination has been observed in a variety of diseases, including RA and diseases of the skin and nervous
system.
Research findings indicate that oral citrullination of human and bacterial proteins by the PAD enzyme produced by P. gingivalis triggers an antibody response to the modified protein. This citrullination by the bacterial PAD occurs within the inflammatory context of periodontal diseases, including periodontitis and gingivitis. The body mounts an inflammatory response to
the citrullinated proteins. This inflammatory response occurs throughout the body, including the joints. The prevailing theory indicates that P. gingivalis-mediated citrullination triggers the autoimmunity typically seen in individuals who are genetically susceptible to rheumatoid arthritis. The autoimmune processes lead to the soft and hard tissue joint damage in individuals with
RA.
The sequence of events in which the disease process is initiated long before the onset of detectable joint damage in RA is reminiscent of the same long time frame for the development of type 2 diabetes. In that case, the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas can be burning out long before the signs of diabetes are noticed by the individual or their health-care
provider.
Research also suggests that individuals with RA have a higher incidence and severity of periodontal disease, and that treatment of gum disease can improve the symptoms of RA. These findings are very preliminary and cannot be understood to be conclusive. However, it is not premature to provide the status of research to patients as long as it is done in an
accurate, ethical manner. Promises of improvement in joint signs and symptoms would be examples of inappropriate verbiage. It would be ethical and appropriate to indicate that research suggests an association between periodontal disease,Pg, and rheumatoid arthritis, but that conclusive evidence does not yet exist. It would be appropriate to use salivary DNA testing to identify the presence of
Pg. It is appropriate and our responsibility to control every bit of periodontal disease. If a patient tests positive for Pg and does not have periodontal disease, it is appropriate to recommend a power toothbrush such as the Philips Sonicare FlexCare Platinum.
It is not too soon for responsible education, treatment, and recommendations. Our patients need not be in the dark about what the scientific community is discovering.
Richard Nagelberg, DDS, has practiced general dentistry in suburban Philadelphia for more than 30 years. He is a speaker, advisory board member, consultant, and key opinion leader for several dental companies and organizations. He lectures on a variety of topics centered on understanding the impact dental professionals have beyond the oral
cavity.

Quick Links
Email: scheduling@babineausmiles.comPhone: 512-306-8900Web: http://babineausmiles.com
3801 Capital of Texas Hwy. N.;Suite E-280, Austin, TX, 78746

April 2015 Newsletter

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April Newsletter July 15, 2015
In this issue

Babineau T-Shirt Design Contest
Babineau T-Shirt Design Contest

First Annual Babineau T-Shirt Design Contest 

The Babineau crew needs your help designing a t-shirt for our team members to wear when we are out and about in Austin doing charity work, fun runs and team building events.

The winner will receive their choice of a free in office KOR Power Whitening session, a Sonicare power brush or your next cleaning on us, as well as bragging rights and a shirt of their own.

Winner will be determined on May 26, 2015 and contacted via email and phone.

Make it cute, make it sassy but above all keep it classy!

Please submit entries to scheduling@babineausmiles.com in a jpeg format.

Stem Cell Banking through Dentistry
Drs. John and Lori have partnered up with Vault Stem Cell to be able to be able to provide patients with the enormous benefits available from stem cell banking from dental pulp tissue.
That is right, teeth! As it turns out, dental pulp is an excellent source of mesenchymal stem cells. A great source of these cells come from teeth, in particular extracted deciduous teeth (baby
teeth), wisdom teeth (3rd molars) and bicuspid teeth commonly extracted for braces.Visit http://www.vaultstemcell.com/home/archives to read more about what this amazing technology is capable of.Through the end of May, any patient interested in banking stem cells from viable dental pulp will have the collection from our office waived. ($75 value).

Please call the office at 512-306-8900 with any questions or learn more on our website.
http://babineausmiles.com/stem-cell-collection-banking/

Dental Implant Package Special
Dental Implant Package SpecialIf you’ve discussed dental implants with Drs. John and Lori but have been putting off beginning treatment, we encourage you to take advantage of our first ever discounted implant package special, valid through 05/31/2015.

Please call our office with any questions or appointment requests.

Quick Links
Email: scheduling@babineausmiles.comPhone: 512-306-8900

Web: http://babineausmiles.com

3801 Capital of Texas Hwy. N.;Suite E-280, Austin, TX, 78746

February 2015 Newsletter

What’s New at Babineau Cosmetic & Family Dentistry!
In this issue

Stem Cell Banking

Stem cell banking has made huge strides in recent years and we are now able to collect and bank cells from the pulp of healthy teeth, i.e. extracted wisdom teeth and baby teeth that are loose but still viable.

We have partnered up with Vault to offer our patients the option to have extracted teeth sent to a lab to have mesenchymal cells stored. These type of cells are tissue forming and can be used to create skin, muscle and organ tissue.

For more information, please visit our website, link provided below.

Childrens Dental Health Awareness

Children are born with a set of primary teeth – 20 to be exact – that help them learn to chew, learn to speak, and develop enough space in the jaw for the permanent teeth that will appear several years later. Kids’ teeth are especially susceptible to decay, which can cause pain and tooth loss, problems that could interfere with oral development. As a parent, it is important that you take proactive steps to keep your child’s primary teeth as healthy as possible.

The Dangers of Bottles and “Sippie Cups”

Also known as early childhood caries, baby bottle tooth decay refers to tooth decay in infants and toddlers. Your child needs strong, healthy primary teeth to chew food properly and learn to speak, so preventing baby bottle tooth decay is very important. Early childhood caries can occur in children as young as a year old, when they are allowed to go to bed with bottles and sippie cups of milk or juice. The sugars in these beverages, even natural sugars, can steadily decay the teeth. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests, and we agree, that milk and juice should only be offered to your child at meal times. Limit juice intake to just a few ounces per day. If your child becomes thirsty between meals or likes to go to bed with a bottle, we suggest you serve water during those times. Proper Hygiene As a parent, you can establish healthy dental habits long before your child’s first tooth erupts. Start by gently wiping your baby’s gums with a clean wash cloth during the first months of life. By age one, graduate to an appropriately sized toothbrush and use a smear of fluoridated toothpaste, about the size of a grain of rice, to brush at least twice a day. When your child is about three years old, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Watch your child as he or she brushes to make sure none of the toothpaste gets swallowed.

Dental Visits Dental visits should start young and continue on a regular basis throughout your child’s life. In our office we recommend they come into our office for a check-up and cleaning usually between ages of 2-3.  Prior to this, the pediatrician is looking in the mouth and visually looking for any abnormalities and decay. The American Dental Association recommends that parents bring their children to the dentist for the first time no later than the child’s second birthday. Initial visits at our office concentrate on an examination of the proper development of your child’s primary dentition and parental education, while future visits may include thorough cleanings and fluoride treatments as your child grows.

Febuary is for (KOR) Power Couples!

February 14th is just around the corner! Take advantage of our Valentine’s Day 2 for 1 whitening special. Normally $450 per session, both you and your valentine can brighten and whiten your smile using our powerful in office KOR whitening system, for the price of one. Offer valid until February
28, 2015.

You can also give yourself a Valentine’s Day gift and enjoy a 50% discount on a solo whitening session.

Quick Links
Email: scheduling@babineausmiles.com

Phone: 512-306-8900

Web: http://babineausmiles.com

3801 Capital of Texas Hwy. N.;Suite E-280, Austin, TX, 78746